The following was written by PEP Class 20 graduate, Jose M. 


PEP Graduate Jose M.

PEP Graduate, Jose M.

Because of PEP and the Ten Driving Values, I am a new man.

As a teenager and a young man, I was a very lost individual. How I became the person I am today is largely due to the program and the tools given to me while incarcerated, to apply to my life on the inside and once released. I started off as a troubled person with no respect or values, but now I have a plan, and I have respect for society and others.

I initially thought PEP was a business program, but eventually I learned it was much more than that. I was skeptical at first, but like others, I began asking questions around the unit about the program. I heard that it was family-oriented and heavily involved in repairing broken homes. I latched onto it for that reason because I love my family very much and was tired of hurting them.

While in class, I learned business skills, which was great. But most importantly, I learned how to identify my character flaws in the Effective Leadership training and through a number of character assessments from my peers. I also learned that I had talents and that I actually had something to contribute to the world. We were given etiquette lessons that taught me how to conduct myself in a number of circumstances. Once released, I was also given the opportunity to continue learning in our eSchool classes. Upon completion, I was given the status of alumni, and in September of this year, I will receive my second diploma from PEP.

We have been given so much by PEP to guarantee our success in the real world. I have been gainfully employed since within a few days after my release, and I am now enrolling into courses to finally complete my college degree. I am closer to my family than I have ever been, and my whole thinking process has improved greatly. I owe so much to PEP. Thank you for opening my eyes and restoring confidence in myself. I know that as long as I work hard and remain positive, I will be successful.

I continue to participate and involve myself when I can to give back. I and others see that I’m a changed individual, and for that, I want to thank everyone involved in the program. It has been a life-changing experience.

Jose M.
Class 20

The following was written by MBA student and executive volunteer, Michael Collins, about his first experience inside prison and how it pushed him outside his comfort zone.


About two years ago I was introduced to the Prison Entrepreneurship Program by my father, who swore to me that my experience with PEP would change my life. He couldn’t have said a truer statement.

The purpose of this organization is to help those who are incarcerated create jobs for themselves once they are released from prison. This is especially important, as most men find it extremely difficult to find employment after transitioning back into society. As a result of this hardship, over half return to prison. To combat this problem, the PEP program equips men with entrepreneurial tools to start their own businesses once released. Similar to the television show, “Shark Tank,” executive volunteers, ranging from CEO’s of globally recognizable companies to graduate students, critique the mens’ business plans and pitches in a competitive setting at the culmination of the program.

Growing up in a white, privileged family, I didn’t have much exposure to individuals who had committed crimes or gone to prison. It was a side of the world which I had really been sheltered from, so as I walked into the facility for the first time, my heart began to beat faster and faster in anticipation. Despite my expectation of being treated like a law-abiding civilian, I was abruptly awakened by the serious tone and treatment by the guards as we were pat-searched and ordered to go through a metal detector.

The other executive volunteers and I then walked down a hallway and into a room, where we were welcomed by the men participating in the program, all cheering and celebrating our presence. After we all got settled, the CEO of PEP began to talk about the program and the agenda for the day. We began with some getting-to-know-you exercises, along with some “surprises” to really get us out of our comfort zones, which were instrumental in breaking down the apprehension I knew existed amongst some of the volunteers in attendance. By the end of this segment, I began to not only see the appreciation the guys had for us being there, but I could also feel the gratitude. It was at this moment I knew this experience was already changing my life.

For the next five hours I spent time meeting with about twenty different inmates one-on-one to hear their business plans and provide feedback. This part of my experience in prison was extremely powerful, as my very distinct perception of inmates changed so drastically. The hours flew by, and I felt like I wasn’t in a prison anymore at all. The men I spoke with were some of the most articulate and personable people I’d ever met, and by the end of the day, it felt like I had just spent my time catching up with old friends. Then, the volunteers were asked to step aside, and the inmates were ordered to file into lines for a count: an eye-opening reality check that I’ll never forget. The atmosphere did a complete 180, and the room went from being a warm social setting with friends, to a cold and harsh prison almost instantly. The men I had just became friends with, and laughed with, were now being treated like rabid animals.

As I drove home from the prison, I struggled mentally to comprehend everything that had occurred while I was there. About a day or two later, I finally understood what all the volunteers had talked about; I could feel how I had changed. All my perspectives and preconceived notions about prisoners had been erased, as the passion and effort I saw from those men rivaled those of famous entrepreneurs.

My experience in prison not only changed my life, but it taught me a lot. I learned that uncomfortable situations are only as stressful as you make them out to be, and that no matter where two people come from, there’s always something you can find you have in common. Since that day I first stepped into that prison, I have been back three times, each less stressful and more enjoyable than the last. But no trip back will ever match my first experience inside those walls, a memory I will always hold dear to my heart.

Mike Collins

Read on for the most recent coverage of how our programs change lives!

http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Texas-Prison-Program-Aims-to-Produce-Business-Savvy-Inmates-288584471.html

The following was written by PEP Class 22 graduate, Barry M. 


PEP Graduate, Barry M.

PEP Graduate, Barry M.

I have spent most of my adult life incarcerated.

For most of this time, I thought I was just a bad person. I thought “I was born this way and there is nothing that I can do about it. I will spend the rest of my life in and out of prison.”

But when PEP supporters like you met me in prison earlier this year, they brought me a very different message. They told me: “You have value.”

By spending a day in prison with total strangers, people like you convinced me that I was not a bad person … I had just been making bad choices. They taught me that, if I made a sincere commitment to myself, I could change.

PEP supporters like you taught me that my past did not have to dictate my future.

This all started when I was sitting in my cell on the Coffield Unit in East Texas. That morning, I received a postcard inviting me to apply to PEP. I asked the others on my cellblock about PEP. They told me not to bother applying because I would never get in.

To be honest, I believed them. But I also knew that it was going to be hard to gain employment with a felony on my record. So, I loved the idea of starting my own business.

But then I met PEP’s recruiter, Marcus Hill. He had served our country in the Army and was now a successful entrepreneur. But I was shocked when I learned that, in between those things, he had spent time in prison. Just like me.

Marcus told me that PEP was much more than a business program. He told me that if I was just applying because I wanted to be an entrepreneur, I would not be accepted. But if I was applying because I needed to change – because I was desperate for a change and willing to go to any length to get it – that I had a chance.

Thankfully, I gave myself that chance.

From the moment that I walked into PEP, my life has not been the same. It feels like I’m in a dream, except I know it’s for real. Although PEP is very challenging, the rewards are greater than anything I could have possibly imagined back in that cell in Coffield.

You truly changed the lives of men like me
by supporting PEP.

The business lessons that you offered us were exceptional. And I have to admit, I am pretty proud of the business plan that I put together! But honestly, what impacted me the most was PEP’s focus on character development.

By guiding me through these programs, people like you helped me to change my thought process. From the thoughts that I think to the words that I speak, you have cleaned me from the inside out.

When I look in the mirror now, I like the man who is looking back. That is something that I could not say for a very, very long time. Thank you for giving me that gift.

To repay you, I am committed to changing the lives of others through my story. But I cannot do it without PEP, and PEP cannot exist without your support. I hope that you will consider donating $22 in honor of Class 22, which graduates this Christmas.

Your gifts matter. They make a difference to men like me, to our families, and to our community. Please go online to www.PEP.org to donate today.

​With gratitude,

Barry M.
Class “Transcendent” 22

p.s. ​The PEP Board of Directors has committed $190,000 in matching funds for every new donation before 12/31/2014! That means that a gift of $22 becomes $44 – enough to sponsor a month of bus passes for men looking for work after release from prison!

Better still … if you can make a monthly commitment, the board will match your commitment $2-to-1 based on the annual value of your gift. That means that committing $10 per month will secure $240 in matching funds for PEP before the end 2014. If you are interested, please email Charles Hearne at CHearne@PEP.org. Thank you for any commitment you can make!

Santa’s are on the job in Austin and San Antonio today! (Graduates delivering presents to the children of other PEP men who are still in prison).  Merry Christmas to all!

PEP graduates Jose Mata, Al Massey and Pat McGee

PEP graduates Jose Mata, Al Massey and Pat McGee

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoying his new bike!

Enjoying his new bike!

Happy kids!

Happy kids!


scurlock-image-e1418744673229
PEP is 100% privately funded.  We rely on the generosity of hundreds of individual donors, grant-making foundations, and corporate sponsors to deliver our life-changing mission. And thanks to a recent study from Baylor University, we know that every dollar that these donors give to PEP generates at least a $3.40 return on investment to our community.

PEP is now embarking on an ambitious new plan to dramatically expand our impact. As we announced here, PEP recently launched our in-prison operations within a second prison in Texas. Our goal is to continue to scale our work in our home state until we can reach at least 10% of all of the inmates released from Texas prisons each year.

Today, we are proud to announce that the Scurlock Foundation has awarded PEP a remarkable FIVE-YEAR grant to support this expansion!

As Billy Wareing, a board member for the Scurlock Foundation, states:

“The Scurlock Foundation is honored to partner with PEP in their transformative work to end the cycle of recidivism in Texas prisons and bring hope to inmates who have lost heart.  The work that PEP does is redemptive in nature and we believe that God is working through PEP to restore families, bring hope through employment opportunities and ultimately restore all things through His son, Jesus.”

Please join us in thanking the Scurlock Foundation for their tremendous investment in our future!

Image  —  Posted: December 16, 2014 in About PEP
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PEP has a rather urgent and important Christmastime need. As many of you know, Highland Park United Methodist Church (in Dallas) is the very generous and sole sponsor of our annual Children’s Christmas Project. For several years now we have collected data on the children of the men in our program from their caregivers, we then put that data on a card that is hung on one of several Christmas trees at the church. We return a few weeks later to sort, wrap, mail and deliver hundreds of Christmas wishes to the precious children of the men in our programs. This year we had almost 200 cards on the trees and unfortunately 48 children did not get picked up or chosen so, we are asking you, our most generous friends, to help us fulfill the wishes of these boys and girls ranging in age from 5 to 18. We have 26 boys and 22 girls.

Our brilliant IT Team and one of our executive volunteers worked together to come up with a solution for these needs … they’ve designed a program and online store to help make giving easy. If you’d like to provide gifts for one or more of the children who were not selected, we can give you that opportunity! The way this works is that each of the 48 children’s wishes have been uploaded into this online store, you may simply click on one or more items and know that you are fulfilling the wishes of a child or children. Your gifts for these children are considered directed donations which means that the funds are restricted for the specific gifts you choose, and the money you spend is a legitimate tax deductible donation for which you will receive a letter from PEP (for use with your 2014 tax return).

The money you spend is exclusively for the benefit of a child of one of our participants like 17-year-old LaMarcus, who asked only for a coat and clothes. LaMarcus enjoys studying and playing sports. He was very close to his father and has missed him terribly in the three years he’s been away.  Or, there’s five-year-old Destin who loves going to the park and playing games.  Destin needs clothes and shoes (her favorite color is pink!), but she’d also love video games.  If you’d like to fulfill a wish or two (or three) please visit http://www.pep.mybigcommerce.com/ and start spreading some Christmas cheer!

If you have questions or need assistance, please call Kristie Wisniewski at 713-366-0293.

Thank you and may you and your family have a very blessed and Merry Christmas!

To support PEP when you shop at Amazon, click here. http://smile.amazon.com/ch/20-1384253

To support PEP when you shop at Amazon, click here.

Great news!

When you shop at Amazon Smile, Amazon will make a donation to the Prison Entrepreneurship Program. Just click here to register, and when you login to Amazon your account will connect to PEP!

http://smile.amazon.com/ch/20-1384253

It is:

  1. Free!
  2. Easy!
  3. AWESOME!

The following was written by PEP Class 18 graduate, John C. 


john c

PEP Class 18 Graduate, John C.

I thank God for putting PEP in my life. I can honestly say that without PEP I would certainly be lost. The program really taught me how to seize the moment, instilling confidence within me. Because of PEP, I know now that I can succeed and that my goals and dreams are attainable.

A great man within PEP once told me that a man without a plan ultimately plans to fail. He let me know that every great business man knows the value of his family, and he is always aware of who is “riding on his bus”.

The invaluable training given to me by PEP on the inside, although mentally straining and severely intense, prepared me for the obstacles sure to come my way upon release. I learned that life is what you make of it. No one is dealt the same hand, and the only thing that matters in the end is how you play the hand you’ve been dealt.

Upon release I was faced with a GPS monitor, parole and probation. I also had two of the most important women in my life play the roles of surrogate parole and probation officers (I love you, Mom!). Along with two AA classes, PEP eSchool, a job, community service and two beautiful children that required much of my attention, there was no time to waste. Losing focus was never an option. But with all my PEP brothers and extended PEP family in my corner rooting me on, success was the only viable outcome. What a great feeling to know that I am not driving a rundown bus on spare tires. Instead, I am chauffeuring a world class charter bus and the passengers are all ready to help me drive if begin to fall asleep.

But I am glad to report that I am not asleep at the wheel. I recently graduated eSchool. I have also successfully completed my parole requirements and have been once and for all cut free from that GPS monitor! I attend AA meetings now, not because I have to, but because it is one of the many practices I believe I should carry on to ensure my continual success.

Honestly, if I can do it, anybody can. All it takes is a little faith in God and the support of amazing people, like those I have in my PEP family.

Thank you for the opportunity to share.

John C.
Class 18 Graduate

The following was written by Tim Tucker, Message South Africa National Director for The Message Trust. You can learn more about this organization on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


Tim Tucker South Africa Message Trust

Tim Tucker, from South Africa’s “The Message Trust”

PEP Pitch Day, Friday 14th November 2014.

Cape Town to Amsterdam. Amsterdam to Atlanta. Atlanta to Dallas. Dallas to Houston and Houston to Cleveland Correctional Center. It was a long trip. Was it worth it? Absolutely. Yes. Definitely. Without a doubt.

My organisation (www.message.org.za) runs programs for juvenile offenders in Cape Town, South Africa. This “pilgrimage” to Texas was to learn from PEP as we seek to deliver a similar programme in Cape Town’s prisons. Notorious for gangsterism, drug dealing and violent crime, we are constantly seeking to improve our interventions in Cape Town’s prisons in order to provide a greater opportunity for ex-offenders to be reintegrated into society. My exposure to PEP’s model greatly inspired and impacted me.

What I experienced was a wonderful blend of the PEP brotherhood, an extremely effective program, and the added dimension of an incredible spirit of determined and deliberate fun, that is a powerful recipe for rehabilitation. From the moment I was greeted by the most moving “guard of honor” I’ve ever experienced (loud music, cheering, and high-fiving the PEP participants), I recognised that PEP has developed something special. As Bert danced to the front to introduce the day, I realised that my British reserve needed to be shelved if I was going to maximise my experience. And from that moment on I was completely absorbed in all that took place.

But I was soon to learn that PEP is not just about feel-good motivational music, dancing, clapping, high-fiving and hoorah’s! We were split up into our various groups to listen to the pitches that the participants had prepared after five months of hard work. The first candidate began his presentation. His concept was well thought through and he presented in an articulate and compelling way. The executive next to me, John-  an experienced PEP business mentor – nudged me and whispered, “that will be one of the best two or three presentations today.” Boy was he wrong! After the next presentation he nudged me again… “wow” he said, “that will also be up there.” After the third equally high calibre presentation he was realising that he would need to eat his words! It was humbling and inspiring to listen to pitch after pitch that had been well thought through and matched the passion and gifting of each participant – together with some great innovative ideas. Scoring them was tough – particularly as, following John’s input, I gave the first participant extremely high marks…

As we gathered once more with the big group, it was evident that each executive had been greatly impacted and impressed. What was also evident is that I wasn’t going to escape from prison without the initiation of dancing… as all us “newbies” were summoned to dance forward. But it was a great privilege to be handed the microphone to share with everyone that the lessons learned on that day were going to make a tangible difference in South African prisons – although I know that South African dancing will eclipse the Texan two-step!

— Tim Tucker (Message Trust)